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Tag: cross

Who am I?

11But Moses said to God, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the children of Israel out of Egypt?” 12He said, “But I will be with you, and this shall be the sign for you, that I have sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall serve God on this mountain.”  13Then Moses said to God, “If I come to the people of Israel and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” 14God said to Moses, “I am who I am.”

Can you remember your first job?  Fast food restaurant, athletic club, or maybe a supermarket.  The first day, they started to train you, and can you remember how that went?

It’s not unusual to feel inadequate for a job.  Feelings of inadequacy are normal when you are doing something new.  You might also feel overwhelmed and lost which cause you to question why you decided to take this job.

Moses stumbles across the burning bush in the midst of his job.  He’s gotten herding sheep down to a science.  He’s good at it.  He feels confident yet is ever-aware of the dangers he might face.  He is up to the challenge.

But a burning bush that isn’t consumed is completely strange.  He doesn’t know what to make of it, so he approaches more closely.

Then God starts to speak.  He tells Moses what he needs to do.  He tells Moses to step out of his comfort zone boldly.  Moses then asks the question, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the children of Israel out of Egypt?”  Do you hear the fear in his voice?  The trepidation?  The worry?  The feeling of inadequacy?

God doesn’t address him with modern psychology.  Instead, God says to him, “I will be with you”.

The very thing God is telling Moses to do is a great and mighty work.  It is an impossible work.  It is a fool’s task, and Moses doesn’t want to look like a fool.  He is afraid of the risk and returning to a powerful nation to demand something when he is powerless.

He might believe he will be thrown in jail for such a request.

It’s possible that Moses had a speech impediment.  We know he had an anger problem.  Like anyone else in this world, he had limitations and “issues”.

But God doesn’t refer to any of these.  Instead, He declares who He is and that He will be with Moses.  All of the success of this enterprise is based on God’s working.

And, wherever He sends, He goes.  He does not abandon His children.  Whatever He asks us to do, His promise is sure that He will be with us.  He says to Moses, “when you have brought the people out of Egypt”, not, “if you bring my people out of Egypt”.  God’s confidence is sure, because His promise is based on His Word.

And this Word is Christ, who is the saving God.  He will lead us to the promised land of heaven.  Why? Because we are without limitations and issues?  No, but because this promise was secured at the cross.  All of our excuses and fears are extinguished by this single phrase, “Lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age”.

In the end, Moses didn’t need to worry about who he was, because God made his name great.  He made his name eternal.

a season of death

Three people from my church have died in the past month.  One of my co-workers lost a close relative two days ago.  My neighbor, who is a wonderful person and a Christian, is dying.

I am grateful that my church follows the calendar of Christ’s life.  I am grateful that we talk about Jesus’ death and resurrection every week.  I am grateful that the gospel accounts are weighted toward the last week of Jesus’ life (especially Mark who devoted six of sixteen chapters on it).

Why am I grateful?  Because the culture I live in lives in denial about death.  Even some other Christian churches seem to side-step the issue, preferring a glorious performance over the grounded truth.

It’s the way of the world.

On the other hand, death is enough.  Romans 5:12 states,

“Therefore, just as through one man sin entered into the world, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men, because all sinned … ”

We stand condemned.  The consequence of our sinfulness is death.  However,

18 So then as through one transgression there resulted condemnation to all men, even so through one act of righteousness there resulted justification of life to all men. 19For as through the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous. 20The Law came in so that the transgression would increase; but where sin increased, grace abounded all the more, 21so that, as sin reigned in death, even so grace would reign through righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Jesus has no desire to see you or me die.  Yet, there is no chariot of fire coming to pick people up and take them home.  Instead, we get the ignoble burial that everyone else gets.  It’s final, sobering, and a buzz-kill.

But, when we continue reading the second portion of this chapter from Romans, Paul writes about the reign of grace.  And, not grace as a word only, but real grace.  The forgiving kind.  The dying kind.  The sacrificial lamb kind.

This only took place one time.  It was on a cross outside Jerusalem.  The righteous God-man was crucified for all sinful men.  Completely.

His death was not the end, though.  In the midst of this dying, God the Father poured out His wrath on His own Son.  Not because Jesus was so bad, but because we are so evil.  Why did God do this?

Because God loves you.  And, He loves me.

Death does not have the final word.  You and I can rest assured by hearing the words of Jesus, “It is finished“.  We can bet on these words.  Our death will actually be the birth of resurrection into an eternal dominion of peace, joy and total love.  Hope fulfilled.   And … the Glory of God.  Forever and ever.

Amen.

Working out your self-deification with arrogance and boasting

When I was in high school, I worked as a stage hand one semester.  I was in the background, helping to move stage elements.  We changed backdrops, moved furniture, and moved props.

We got to see everything back there.  The audience, though, was unaware of anything but what they saw in front of them.

This is true for our view of the world, too.  Most people are largely unaware of what “backdrops” are behind their thinking.  It’s too much work to figure it out.  It’s more fun just to watch the play.

Our view of the purpose of the Bible is also influenced by our background beliefs.  Everyone comes to it with beliefs/perspectives of what it’s about.  And, if they don’t have any prior experience with it, they soon become aware that it talks a lot about commands, God, promises, war, sex, death, resurrection, angels and other “religious stuff”.

This helps to explain the differences in denominations.  If you go to a church, you probably accept their “backdrop” explanation of the purpose of the Bible.

But, is it correct?  Have you ever considered that conservative Christians (not talking politically here) have legitimate and valid differences concerning the purpose of the Bible?

One of the current “backdrops” is called “Lordship Salvation”.  It assumes that the Bible is a book of rules that we must follow perfectly otherwise we are not true disciples.  Christians in these churches assume that their church is “Biblical”.  They assume that Christians in other churches are weak or disobedient.  They assume this because this is the result of what they believe about the Bible and the Christian life.

Where does this belief come from?  Why do people believe that once they “receive Jesus” or “repent and believe” (as the Lordship Salvation camp would say), they must “get to work”, “live obediently” and “put your nose to the grindstone”?  Why does the Christian life return to me and my works?

Simple.  This is the theology of the Old Adam.  It is a theology that denies  the Lordship of Christ.  The Old Man denies that Christ is “the founder and perfecter of our faith” (Hebrews 12:2).  He denies John 6:28-29 which the disciples ask, “What must we do, to be doing the works of God?” Jesus answered them, “This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He has sent.” The Old Adam denies Hebrews 10:10 which states, “By this will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.”

And in so denying that these verses are for Christians, the Old Adam denies Christ, Himself.  The Old Adam replaces Jesus with his own works, effort and obedience.  The Old Adam works to keep himself alive rather than submit to the crucifixion of Jesus as both the one who births faith in us and feeds faith through the means of grace.

The Old Adam is busy keeping himself as god.  He is his own lord.  He lives a blasphemous life.

And because of the extreme moral demands of Lordship Salvation, Christians under this theology can go only three directions:

In the first option, they can become self-righteous, arrogant about their relationship with God, and in denial about the depth of God’s demands on their lives.  This person is willing to judge others harshly and never examine his/her own life in light of the “full thundering” of the Law.  They become deeply judgmental, lacking any love.

In the second option, the Christian of sensitive conscience is thrown into despair about their salvation.  Martin Luther, the great reformer, fell into this camp when the terrors of Roman Catholic theology scared him into a monastery to find peace.  Eventually, these Christians will either leave the church, or have their faith shipwrecked.  Some of these people become hopeless and becomes agnostics/atheists because of the lack of mercy in these church bodies.

In the third option, they can remain superficial, never taking any of it seriously, and covering up with a false edifice.

There is a fourth option, however.  Along with many other who have escaped the clutches of Lordship Salvation, I encountered a completely different backdrop when I read Martin Luther.  Because I had lived in both the first and second options, Luther’s Bondage of the Will was like a key to open the prison door I lived in.

His view was that we begin and end with Christ when it comes to the Christian life.  In Biblical terms, that means that Jesus retains His lordship as the Alpha and the Omega.  We are to come to church to hear “Christ crucified” rather than the “ten steps to overcoming sin”.

This is a theology of reception.  It is a theology that believes that God is at work on and in us, and that it is His pleasure to do so.

It is a theology that views the Scripture as the manger in which we find the Christ-child.  He is the heart of its meaning, purpose and proclamation.  Read Hebrews.  Is it about you or about Jesus?  Read the Gospel from Matthew, Mark, Luke or John.  Is it about you or Jesus?

And, having this “cross theology” also means that we interpret the Bible as being Law or Gospel.  This means that God’s demands reveal our inherent sinfulness, but God has provided His own Son to fulfill ALL of these demands and cleanse us from ALL sin.  Even the sin of trying to be your/my own God.

Why does He do this?  Look at Romans 3:

 21 But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction: 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, 25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. 26 It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.

 Acts 4:12 states; “And there is salvation in no one else; for there is no other name under heaven that has been given among men by which we must be saved.” No other name, not even your own.

To the Glory of His Holy Lordship, Amen.

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